Loving Embrace

Sometimes it is those that are forced to fight that could use the most compassion when they come back home again. This design was inspired by a soldier's struggle to recover from the horrors of war and the aftermath of returning to the home they helped to protect. Take this opportunity to spread the love and extend a caring connection to those around you with the message in this design meant to show those suffering from PTSD that there is still love and hope to be found in the world and people who will help them readjust in a safer place here at home. This design is also meant to show the lasting effects of war, even for those who might be seen as the "winners". War is a dangerous game and there are few that come out of it unharmed.

What do you think of this design?  What images and thoughts does it conjure up in you and how does it help show the world who you are?  Add to the conversation by commenting below.




Tokii .
Tokii .

Author



4 Responses

Debby
Debby

February 12, 2016

As the wife of a service member, I can understand the feeling of knowing that you cannot help another person deal with what he has seen. This painting really captures that feeling.

Morgan
Morgan

January 27, 2016

This picture could be interpreted from the viewpoint of either the children or the soldier. The children want to cling to their father, but he’s inaccessible, either physically due to deployment or mentally due to the mental scars left by active duty. The soldier/father seems to feel disconnected from his family – they’re close enough to touch, but they might as well be a million miles away.

Ronan
Ronan

January 26, 2016

The colors and choice of background draw the viewer in. The fact that the structures in the background at first appear to be rock faces and then resolve into boom town buildings on closer inspection gives the viewer reason to keep looking. It’s strange that the man’s face is covered by his hat, making one wonder if the artist is confident rendering faces. The children are rendered in a way that disrupts the color theme outside of them. This supports the theme of a father who is tempted to leave his family, but is not supported aesthetically.

Allison
Allison

January 18, 2016

When I first looked at this, I immediately thought of Francisco Goya, the 19th century Spanish artist who created a lot of grotesque, often creepy paintings. A lot of his paintings had to do with war and human destruction, so I can really see this same mood captivated here.

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